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Added Jan 10 2018

Troy LaRaviere, a former CPS principal and president of the Chicago Principals and Administrators Association, attends a town hall gathering on fair elections legislation at Ebenezer Lutheran Church, 1650 W. Foster Ave., on Nov. 15, 2017, in Chicago.

Original article
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-troy-laraviere-rahm-emanuel-morning-spin-story.html
Date published
January 10, 2018
    Morning Spin: One of Emanuel's harshest critics creates campaign fund for 2019 mayoral run
    Welcome to Clout Street: Morning Spin, our weekday feature to catch you up with what's going on in government and politics from Chicago to Springfield. Subscribe here. Chicago principals association President Troy LaRaviere has filed the paperwork to launch a campaign to unseat Mayor Rahm Emanuel in 2019.
    http://www.chicagotribune.com
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  • robin in WRP I support a 28th Amendment 4Free & Fair Elections!

    I don't understand your concern. it is based on the candidates positions on issues that concern you?

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  • robin in WRP I support a 28th Amendment 4Free & Fair Elections!

    And those positions are...?

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  • K in North Center longtime North Side resident

    I'm quite familiar with Mr. LaRaviere's work. While he was principal at Blaine, he was well-respected not only at the school (by parents and teachers) but among his peers. In fact, they elected him as head of the principals' association by a healthy majority of the votes.

    He was an outspoken critic of CPS and its policies as well as the mayor. In fact, he was the first one to publicly speak up about the principal "training" mandated by Barbara Byrd-Bennet (who, if you don't know the name, was convicted of various counts related to getting kickbacks for arranging the training for that principal training).

    So I don't think anyone should be concerned about him getting too cozy with CPS.

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  • Mute, he was NOT fired by other principals. He was fired by a broken, corrupted system in which good principals are just another casualty, like pretty much everything else. His peers respected him. I know some of his former staff and students' parents who genuinely revere him. It's because of his peers respect that he became the head of the association. Rest more than reassured that the Board and Rahm won't benefit from his candidacy.

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  • He was fired by CPS. The association is independent of CPS. He is well-respected by his peers.

  • Love him or hate him

    But here’s something that any blaine parent, or anyone that’s had any first hand experience with him knows

    He has no handlers

  • As a former colleague of his, I don't think it's accurate to say that he is "well-respected by his peers". Many of his peers see him as a egotist who admitted to running for CPAA president solely as a stepping stone to mayor. To say his election margins speak to how much people like/trust him is a fallacy. The election was yet another one where we had little choice between two poor candidates: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-chicago-principals-association-election-controversy-met-20160518-story.html

    His tenure as principal was, similarly, focused on Troy, not the kids. Real principals, I believe, focus on running schools, not making headlines. The kids and teachers should always be in the spotlight for their successes.

    Even if you agree with his disapproval of our current mayor (which I do, wholeheartedly), it may be worth reconsidering having another egotistical blowhard in office who thinks the only strategy for governing is making inflammatory statements.

  • Neighbor, I can totally see that

  • Neighbor, "colleague" as in "another principal" or were you one of his teachers or staff? I'm aware of how the position that you occupied might have had an impact on your views. Not saying that it did but that it "might" and for the record I also know people out there with great reputations who have shown their true colors when you get to work with them one on one so I'm not ignoring your views by any means. Yet there is also overwhelming evidence of school community support towards this candidate.

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  • Struwwel, I appreciate the kind response to a different viewpoint. Unfortunately, I'm not comfortable revealing the exact relationship, which I recognize could lessen the impact of my statements. I hope, though, to provide another lens through which to view this candidacy, despite the positive press for being anti-Emmanual.

    I readily concede that there was a large and vocal group of parents who supported him. Much of the day to day running of the school was done by other staff members who were great at their jobs. For what it's worth, I think there's sometimes a good case for strong symbolic leaders who allow others to tend to the nuts and bolts and build others' leadership capacities. It seems that Troy takes the credit for that work, though.

    I would prefer a mayor who is interested in building bridges across the divides in our city, while also having the courage to stand up against long-standing practices that have resulted in the segregation, disenfranchisement, and unethical inequalities at the heart of our biggest issues.

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  • mute, what is?

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  • K in North Center longtime North Side resident

    His ties to CPS are a plus, to me. Having firsthand knowledge of what's involved in educating the next generation of Chicagoans can only be a good thing, if you ask me. I think it's also time to elect a person of color again, in order to bring a new perspective to this office.

  • K, I was in agreement with you right until you brought up color.

    Saying "it's time for a black mayor" is just as racist as saying "it's time for a white mayor"

    there is ZERO difference.

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  • GoTroy!

  • My thumbs down stalker, Jill H doesn't like it when people point out racism. Kinda weird Jill, that you let me live in your skull rent-free.

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  • In my opinion, one of La Raviere's strong assets as a candidate is his in-depth knowledge of a system whose unfathomable shortcomings resemble a lot of what needs to be fixed in the counterproductive city beaurocracy (terrible public spending choices and practices that reflect lucrative interests of individuals rather that what's fair for the citizens at large, lack of transparency, dysfunctional mandates that defeat the purpose, and the list goes on). Yet I would be extremely careful with the language that his followers choose to support him. I would support him to the moon and back but I would never feel that someone who doesn't is less smart. I know that anyone who disagrees with me probably has good reasons to do so even if it's not obvious at first. Let's not repeat past errors. We are in this together. Let's choose someone who help us understand each other better, a bona fide educator. Let us not choose another one of those who wants us to hate each other. Life is too short for more of that.

  • K in North Center longtime North Side resident

    Beezil -- not sure why you are taking issue with me saying that it's time a person of color became mayor again. Chicago has had mainly white mayors and all male mayors except one. The city is not composed of 90% white males, so most of the past mayors do not have a true understanding of what it's like *not* to be a white male -- and therefore likely cannot represent many of the city's residents. .

    https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20170914/near-west-side/census-white-black-hispanic-majority-minority-race-ethnicity-population-change-2016-2017-decline

    Chicago also has many capable, qualified women and people of color who could do a better job of advocating for those who are underrepresented in public offices. So why not give them a shot?

  • I'm taking issue with it, because the way you are presenting it is wrong-headed.

    EVERYONE has a shot.

    NO ONE should give more value, consideration nor advantage to any candidate for their sex, color, etc than the other.

    A candidate should be judged above all else for their experience, skill, talent, etc....

    This of course should be the case in any situation, not just an election

    The "content of character" rather than any physical characteristics, (as MLK jr wished.)

    What you are suggesting by saying "time for someone of color" is a form of reverse-racist, social activism bent backwards on itself so that it forms an opposite universe....it's illogical and antithetical

  • K in North Center longtime North Side resident

    Everyone does not have a shot. Schools are still segregated, schools with majority minority populations are under-resourced. Women are paid less than men.

    Call me wrongheaded if you like. But the current process for getting elected to offices such as mayor and governor means that the amount of money a candidate can raise largely determines who gets to run.

    As for MLK Jr., please cite your source.

  • JoeFlatwoods Love my Albany Park Neighborhood

    K I take issue with it, too. We have had two black mayors in the past, and I would like to know how they were better than anyone else. Sawyer? Nice guy, but what else? Harold Washington? I wish a black mayor, president, etc, would be revered for his or her skills rather than for simply showing up and being black. Not that Obama is black, since he is only half. I do hope that whoever does become the first black president of the US does an amazing job. I hope whatever mayor we do get next does a better job than the last several, no matter the gender or color.

  • There have been leaders elected from both sexes, various age groups, economic backgrounds from rich to dirt poor, and from just about every ethnicity in the country for decades.

    EVERYONE has a shot who is hard-working and diligent. This is not arguable.

    Cite my source? you can't really be serious? If you don't recognize the origin of "content of character" then I suppose that explains why you are having such trouble understanding the concept and truth of -EQUALITY-

    Try this on for size, and that goes for anyone attempting to debate or make statements about the condition of race relations:

    For whatever comparative statement being made, try its inverse. If it sounds racist, ignorant, stupid, or flawed, then your original premise is as well.

    for example,

    "I think its time a black woman to be mayor of chicago"

    and then:

    "I think its time for a white man to be mayor of chicago"

    I think its preposterous that I have to point out the absurdity of both statements, but for the sake of the exercise.......

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  • future alderman future alderman

    anyone who doesn't know the content of character, color of skin quote should not be looked at as anything but an armchair liberal-at best-unfortunately with the escalating cost of living that's who we're left with

  • K in North Center longtime North Side resident

    There's a lot of debate about the meaning of Dr. King's quote. Example:

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/mlks-content-of-character-quote-inspires-debate/

    What I don't see is any source proving that he meant that race doesn't matter. Dreaming that someday people will not be valued just for being white or devalued just for being Black is not the same as saying skin color doesn't affect how someone views the world. In fact, here's what his daughter has said:

    ***********

    Bernice King doubts her father would seek to ignore differences.

    "When he talked about the beloved community, he talked about everyone bringing their gifts, their talents, their cultural experiences," she says. "We live in a society where we may have differences, of course, but we learn to celebrate these differences."

    **************

    If we remove race from the equation, LaRaviere still seems like the best candidate to represent Chicagoans. He's got a strong record of public service and actually grew up in Chicago. The fact that he's African-American gives him a perspective that Rahm or Garry McCarthy or Paul Vallas do not and cannot have, whether you like it or not. The city is still largely segregated, so someone like Rahm simply doesn't have the richness of experience that LaRaviere can bring to the job. It's only been a year since the DOJ found a pattern of civil-rights violations in the police department, and electing a person of color would be a huge step toward gaining some trust and harmony between residents and public officials (especially the police).

    In any case, I think we have once again gone past the line of civil discourse and verifiable facts into name-calling and insults. So I'm gonna sign off and go relax in my liberal armchair.

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  • future alderman future alderman

    anyone who needs the doj to tell them cops, as a whole, are racist is an arm-chair liberal

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